Archive for March, 2009

28
Mar
09

What plays behind those sleeping eyes?

I saw this on a blog today and wanted to share.  It’s simply amazing!  I sat watching this thinking, “How do they come up with this cool stuff?  Where do the ideas come from?”  Imagination is a beautiful thing.  I hope this inspires you today!

Advertisements
05
Mar
09

Charmed Challenge

We had so much fun dreaming up, designing, and piecing together pieces for the Sunrise Challenge. Thank you to everyone who got inspired!

Our new Inspirational Challenge is: Charmed! Completely up to the imagination, Charmed could mean good luck or lots of fun charms, or even being swept away by a dashing person. 😉

Ta Dah!  Here we have it.  The CHARMED slide show 🙂

04
Mar
09

Know your Feldspar

Let’s start with Wikipedia’s definition of Feldspar as: the name of a group of rock-forming minerals which make up as much as 60% of the Earth’s crust.

Feldspars crystallize from magma, and they can also occur as compact minerals, as veins, and are also present in many types of metamorphic rock.

Now, let’s hear about all the great variations  of Feldspar from our guest blogger, Kristen of Earth Charms~

I have recently seen a lot of larvikite being sold as spectrolite. I thought I would jump in here and straighten things out.

First of all, we will start with Labradorite:

Labradorite (calcium sodium aluminum silicate) is a stone that doesn’t look

Labradorite

Labradorite

special until you see what we like to call “the flash”. The surface of the stone shows off an amazing array of colors (sometimes a full spectrum). A mineral resource describes it this way, “Labradorite can produce a colorful play of light across cleavage planes and in sliced sections called labradorescence.” Labradorite tends to be a dull grey/green in color until you see the flashes. Most of the flashes you see will be blue, aqua, green, yellow/gold, and orange.

Spectrolite

Spectrolite

Spectrolite is labradorite. It is the labradorite with the most intense colorful flashes, the highest quality mineral specimens. If you Google “Image spectrolite”, you’ll see it’s labradorite with the flash on full blast.

Now how about larvikite?

Larvikite is a feldspar like labradorite. This means it also has the flashy properties. However, larvikite is a grey and black stone with blue and white flashes. Larvikite is known by many names, including: Birds Eye Granite, Black Moonstone, Blue Norwegian Moonstone, Blue Pearl Granite, Blue Granite, Norwegian Pearl Granite,

Larvikite

Larvikite

Emerald Pearl, and Pub Stone. It is not, however, a granite or a pearl by any means. It IS related to moonstone (which is also a flashy feldspar like labradorite).

Larvikite is not spectrolite! The colors of these stones are easily distinguishable.

The pictures to the right are, from top to bottom: labradorite, spectrolite, larvikite, moonstone

Sunstone has inclusions of red hematite, giving it a warm-toned, glittery appearance. Sunstone is also known as “red labradorite” and “aventurine-feldspar”. The Oregon variety of sunstone can contain copper crystals, and those stones are known as “schillers”. The colors range from pale orange to deep red, depending on the inclusions.

Moonstone

Moonstone

Moonstones are either the mineral adularia, or the combination of plagioclase feldspar oligoclase. Moonstones tend to have a pale color, soft appearance, and either a light shimmer on the surface or blue flashes similar to those in labradorite. Commonly, moonstones in jewelry are white, grey, or peach in color.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Thanks to Kristen of Earth Charms for all that great information.